White-faced ibis and The Art of Making Art

The white-faced ibis (Plegadis chihi) is a wading bird in the ibis family Threskiornithidae. Winter Quintana, Texas

This species breeds colonially in marshes, usually nesting in bushes or low trees. Its breeding range extends from the western United States south through Mexico, as well as from southeastern Brazil and southeastern Bolivia south to central Argentina, and along the coast of central Chile. Its winter range extends from southern California and Louisiana south to include the rest of its breeding range.

Contents 1 Description 2 Distribution 3 Origin 4 Feeding 5 Breeding and nesting 6 Lifespan 7 Threats 8 References 9 External links

Description Non-breeding plumage

The white-faced ibis is very similar to the glossy ibis in its non-breeding plumages, but it tends to be slightly smaller and the plumage color is somewhat warmer. Breeding adults have a pink bare face bordered with white feathers (rather than a bluish bare face with no bordering feathers), a grey bill, and brighter colored, redder legs. Adults have red eyes year-round, whereas glossy ibises have dark eyes. Juveniles of the two species are nearly identical. Distribution

The white-faced ibis occurs in Canada, the United States, Central America and the southern half of South America. In 2012, the total population size was estimated to be 1.2 million individuals, and increasing. The IUCN rates it as being of Least Concern. Origin

The white-faced ibis bears a strong resemblance to the related glossy ibis and in the past was sometimes considered to be a subspecies of the glossy ibis. Another theory was that upon coming to the New World, a small isolated glossy ibis population evolved to become its own separate species. However, recent molecular phylogenetic studies show that the white-faced ibis may actually be paraphyletic. In fact, members of the white-faced ibis populations in the United States appear to be more closely related to glossy ibises than to members of white-faced ibis populations in Southern Brazil. Feeding

The white-faced ibis eats a variety of organisms, including many invertebrates such as insects, leeches, snails and earthworms. It may also eat vertebrates such as fish, crayfish, newts, and frogs. Its feeding style is to use its bill to probe for prey. Breeding and nesting

This species breeds colonially in marshes, usually nesting in bushes or low trees. Its breeding range extends from the western United States south through Mexico, as well as from southeastern Brazil and southeastern Bolivia south to central Argentina, and along the coast of central Chile. Its winter range extends from southern California and Louisiana south to include the rest of its breeding range. The white-faced ibis chooses to nest in the parts of a marsh with dense vegetation such as bulrush, cattails, shrubs and short trees. It will then build a nest from reeds. The white-faced ibis usually lays three or four blue-green eggs at a time. Lifespan

White-faced ibises in captivity live up to fourteen years on average. In the wild, white-faced ibises usually live for nine years; however the oldest recorded wild white-faced ibis lived for fourteen years and six months. Threats

In the past, the white-faced ibis faced many threats from humans. Studies completed in Utah in the 1960s (before this species was added to the Migratory Bird Treaty Act) showed that 82.9% of recorded deaths in banded birds were a result of being shot. However, the main causes of decline of this species previously were pesticides and habitat destruction. The pesticide DDT caused eggshells to be so thin and fragile that parent white-faced ibises crushed the eggs when they were incubating them. Also, since this species is so dependent on wetlands and marshes for both feeding and nesting, changes to water systems such as pollution and man-made draining of water habitats had devastating impacts on members of this species in the past. In order to correct these damages, DDT was banned in 1970 and various programs were created to better maintain and protect wetland nesting habitats. Yet, there is still some debate as to whether or not populations of white-faced ibises in all geographic areas are recovered and growing.

The Art of Making Art and White-faced ibis

"The Art of Making Art" is the 162nd episode of the ABC television series Desperate Housewives. It is the fifth episode of the show's eighth season and was broadcast on October 23, 2011.

Contents 1 Plot 2 Reception 3 Notes 4 International titles 5 References

Plot

Susan is mortified, but tries her best to comply when her art teacher, Andre Zeller, asks the students to show up to class naked in order to help them create from a point of honesty. When Susan learns this, she tries making breakfast naked, but she isn't a naked person. Bree serves up some delicious, homemade soup for the homeless at the local shelter, but ends up enticing the local hipsters and pushing out those in need; Gaby finds herself without a staff to help set up a school event when her lackadaisical approach to her new job as president of the PBA insults the parent volunteers; Renee helps a reluctant Lynette get back into the dating pool by taking her to a singles bar; and Carlos finds himself hitting rock bottom when the guilt over murdering Gaby's stepfather begins to engulf him. Reception

According to Nielsen ratings, "The Art of Making Art" was watched by 9.17 million viewers and held 3.0 rating between 18 and 49 years of age. The episode was competing against Sunday Night Football on NBC, which averaged 12.47 million viewers and a 5.2 rating/13 share, The Good Wife on CBS, which was watched by 9.77 million viewers but held a 2.0 rating, and Game 4 of the 2011 World Series on Fox which was watched by 15.16 million viewers and held 4.2/11 rating in the 18-49 demographic.. The ratings were up from the previous episode "School of Hard Knocks", which had set a series low in total viewers and in the 18-49 demographic. The slight increase in ratings was largely due to the lead in from the series premiere of Once Upon a Time at 8:00 pm Eastern/7:00 pm Central on ABC which was watched by 12.93 million viewers and received a 4.0 in the 18-49 demographic. The episode gained an additional 2.1 million viewers and 0.9 rating in the week following the original broadcast due to DVR recordings. Notes Jonathan Cake (Chuck Vance) and Madison De La Garza (Juanita Solis) do not appear in this episode and are not credited. International titles German: Sex erlaubt (Sex allowed) Polish: Sztuka tworzenia sztuki (Art of creating art) Hebrew: האומנות שבעשיית האומנות (The art in creating art)
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